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Attorneys for state ask judge to reinstate limits on campaign donations

Federal worker gets 6 months for sexually assaulting co-worker

Feds won't try to prosecute Canadians who walked in park hot springs

Operator of Colstrip plants wants to 'expedite' departure from that role

Flooding in northwestern Montana closes 3 roads, including Sun Road

Environmental groups sue feds over transfer of bison range to tribes

Fatal shooting in mountains near Augusta still casts a pall

Oregon widow sues MT rafting firm for husband's death on Gallatin river

Medical board tries to learn more about pain treatment, opioid abuse

Officials clear Great Falls middle school after bomb threat

Governor candidates talk of creating more high-paying jobs in state

MT freezes account of Flathead woman probed for investment fraud

Gianforte loans campaign $150K, raises another $100K from backers

Butte burglars snatch thousands of dollars worth of medical marijuana

Foundation names Montana's 4 most endangered state parks

Have term limits weakened the Legislature?

Storm pounds Billings region with golf-ball size hail

Critter runs loose in Billings during hail storm ('What is it? It's a pig!')

Museum of Rockies and backers bid farewell to Jack Horner

Analysis: Term limits don't actually shorten legislators' time in office

Primary election should be key pivot point in GOP 'civil war'

Trust raises funds to set aside large area on Missoula's south side

Watch out recreationists: As the weather warms, ticks come out

Former youth court officer gets deferred sentence for sexual assault

2 Kalispell women accused of locking 3 children in dark basement

Former President Bill Clinton stumps for his wife in Billings

After GTF dam malfunctions, state destroys 500K trout at hatchery

Regents approve naming MSU computer science school after Gianforte 

Judge to hear arguments on order to loosen certain contribution limits

Motl goes after MT Growth Network, targets other conservative groups

As MSU defends using Gianforte name at school, some students protest

Guard indicted on charges of smuggling meth, pot into state prison

Billings faces Jackson, Wyo, in finals of 'best town ever' contest

Firm that spilled oil near Browning wants criminal charges dropped

Campbell pleads no contest to shooting neighbor in Augusta area

Parole denied again for inmate who committed 1951 Shelby murder

Officials worry about drought conditions along Rocky Mountain Front

Motl will try to block ruling that lifts limits on campaign contributions

Bill Clinton will visit Billings middle school Friday evening

MSU puts $28M Romney Hall renovation project at top of wish list again

MSU plan to name department after Gianforte draws sparse criticism

State may release records on pensions for 39K public employees 


BUSINESS / ECONOMY


Montana's railroads in depths of what looks like a recession

Hecla Mining buying Montanore Mine

Flathead meat packer to expand with new plant at Columbia Falls site

Unions, non-profit groups see big changes in store with overtime rules

Flathead restaurant chain builds new HQs as it expands

NorthWestern CEO indicates utility not interested in buying Colstrip units

New owners of Copper King Hotel plan $8M makeover; giveaway

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SPORTS / OUTDOORS



MSU-Northern running back Ethan Blythe dies at 20; cause unknown

Big Sky hurdler finished race despite ruptured Achilles tendon

UM notches best attendances in FCS: 21,349

Libby freshman shatters record after shooting 63 on tourney's last day

MSU forward Price leaving team due to injury

Griz receiver Ben Roberts signs deal with Tennessee Titans

Former Griz & lawyer Andrew Schmidt makes 1st deal as  NFL agent


OPINION

Regents should get a plan before selling any more names on buildings

Legislators should drop bill banning naming of buildings after candidates

Keep limits on what can be contributed to campaigns

EPA will have to change its tune on mine tailings removal in Butte

Time to be more honest about bison and brucellosis

A tip for Yellowstone Park visitors: Bison are a whole lot faster than you

Time to put some of our foolish tourists in the stocks?

Supreme Court ruling on immigration sure sign of judicial tyranny

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FEATURES


Historian awed by steamboat captain who visited Ft Benton, died young

Yellowstone Park Hotel in tip top shape as it turns 125

Novelist based in London, but her books play out in western Montana

CNN's Anthony Bourdain finds inspiration in MT, writer Jim Harrison

Yellowstone's Lake Hotel celebrates 125th year of hosting guests

Late senator helped preserve historic character of state Capitol

Billings author takes long road, visiting all 56 counties, to write new book


CALENDAR​​

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Lineup set for Butte's folk festival July 8-10

Moods of the Madison set to rock Ennis July 15-16

Legendary rock band KISS to perform at MSU July 16

James Taylor to perform in Bozeman July 18

Red Ants Pants Music Festival set for July 28-31

Alabama, Chris Young among headliners at State Fair in GTF

Keith Urban plans Aug. 4 concert in Bozeman

Ziggy Marley to headline Billings Magic City Blues Festival in August

Jason Derulo on stage at MontanaFair in Billings Aug. 12

Emmy Lou Harris, John Prine performing in Gardiner Aug. 25

Def Leppard, REO Speedwagon, Tesla in Billings Sept. 14

 

Send tips to editor@montanabuzz.com

Motorists watch as flood waters wash over Lake Drive north of Columbia Falls Monday due to recent heavy rains in the Flathead Valley. (Hungry Horse News)

THE BUZZ

​​​​​​​​​​A daily digest of Montana news


May 24, 2016

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ANITA Whitworth, a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe, hates the Washington Redskin's moniker. She agrees with activists who argue that the problems that plague America's Indian reservations can be fixed only if the youth living there can take pride in who they are. 

Anita, a chemical dependency counselor, said she's been the victim of discrimination -- even called a "redskin" -- and she doesn't want her son to experience the same trauma.

Ironically, Anita's husband, Rusty, feels differently about the football team's name. “Just let them keep it,” says the laborer who works on ranches in the Flathead Valley. “It ain’t hurting nobody.”

Ironically, Rusty's opinion on the Redskin's name reflects the views of other Native Americans, by a long shot. A new Washington Post poll has found that nine in 10 Native Americans aren't offended by the name. The poll, which surveyed 504 people in every state and the District of Columbia, was consistent with the results of an earlier 2004 poll.


THE THEME song of Montana City must be artist Pharrell's "Happy." Because the little burg a few miles south of the state's capital city is the nation's third happiest city, according the online web site Zippia.

“We certainly didn’t see it coming, not because we don’t think it’s right; but simply because, who has Montana City on their places to visit list?" say the folks at Zippia. "Well, we certainly do now. It’s one of the least impoverished, most employed, and houses some of the most married residents (in their own houses, of course) in the entire country. It’s like the warm blanket fresh out of the dryer of places.”

As you can see from what Zippia had to say about Montana City, three of the criteria used to measure a city's "happiest" included the amount of poverty, jobless rates,and marriage levels, because getting and staying married generally has happiness benefits. Other measures: Length of commutes to work, home ownership, and costs of living.

If you live in Montana City, and are unhappy and want a change, you might try moving to Frontenac, Mo. That was No. 1 on Zippia's list.



WHO MAKES Montana's best pizza? It's Eugene's Pizza of Glasgow, according to those who submitted thousands of votes in this year's Montana Mint pizza championship runoff. 

Eugene's, which also won last year's contest, beat out 59 competitors over three rounds of voting conducted over three weeks. About 30,000 votes were cast online.

Pretty impressive, considering Glasgow is about as far as you can get from Montana's population centers. Eugene's pizzas must be pretty darn good, and its customers pretty darn loyal. It might be worth a drive. But if you find that a bit far to go, Eugene's will overnight deliver its pizzas half-cooked.

Eugene's competition in the final four were Nalivka's of Havre, Howard's Pizza of Great Falls, and MacKenzie River Pizza Company.

“The people of Montana have spoken: the best pizza in Montana can be found on the Hi-Line,” said a Montana Mint spokesman. “Eugene’s recipe for success seems to be great pizza and a VERY loyal fan base.  Their fans came up huge on social media, which ended up being the difference. Eugene’s is turning into the Duke University of Montana pizza.”

 

LIKE OTHER Americans, Montanans will flock to church on Easter. But there probably will be fewer of them filling the pews in Montana than there are in other parts of the country. Montanans just tend to be less religious than do Americans in other regions.

According to the Association of Religion Data Archives, Montana ranked 40th in terms of church membership in 2010. Many of the other states with low church membership were, like Montana, in the Rocky Mountain region or the West. 

Still, there were a few exceptions to that trend, The state with the nation's highest rate of church membership is Utah, while North Dakota is second.



WOULD YOU mind shelling out extra money every time you put gas in the tank if the revenue was used to improve the roads you drive on? Montanans apparently are, if a survey by the state's Chamber of Commerce is an accurate gauge.

A poll done for the Chamber in February of 800 Montana voters found that, by a 52 to 41 percent margin, Montanans are willing to pay a higher gas tax to fund work on roads and bridges.

The margin of support for a gas tax hike jumped to 56-28 when those polled were told the tax was last raised in 1993, that lower-priced fuel has reduced gas tax revenue, and that highway construction costs have risen by 68 percent.

So how much should the tax be raised? Almost half -- 47 percent -- said by 5 cents a gallon, while 30 percent were willing to see a 10 cent hike. Fourteen percent would pay more than 10 cents a gallon.